HP eNews Update | 30 July 2018

AMS
www.menopause.org.au July 30 2019
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HP eNews

Welcome to AMS HP eNews for doctors and other healthcare professionals who have a special interest in women's health. The content covers information and resources relevant to menopause, midlife and the promotion of healthy ageing.
 

In this edition

 

July 2018

Assessment and management of bone health in women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer receiving endocrine therapy

Women receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitors and the subset of premenopausal woman on tamoxifen have accelerated bone loss and increased fracture risk. Both bisphosphonates and denosumab prevent bone loss; additionally denosumab has proven anti-fracture benefit.

Women considering endocrine therapy need fracture risk assessment, including clinical risk factors, biochemistry and bone mineral density (BMD) measurement, with monitoring based on risk factors. Weight-bearing exercise, vitamin D and calcium sufficiency are recommended routinely. Antiresorptive treatment should be considered in women with prevalent or incident clinical or morphometric fractures, a T-score (or Z-scores in women < 50 years) of < -2.0 at any site, or if annual bone loss is ≥ 5%, considering baseline BMD and other fracture risk factors.

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Hormone therapy in menopausal women with fibroids: is it safe?

Endometrial cancer is the sixth most common cancer in women world-wide and most commonly occurs after the menopause (75%). About 319,000 new cases were diagnosed world-wide in 2012. Endometrial cancer is commonly considered as a potentially 'curable cancer', as approximately 75% of cases are diagnosed before disease has spread outside the uterus. The overall 5-year survival for all stages is about 86%, and, if the cancer is confined to the uterus, the 5-year survival rate may increase to 97%.

We searched the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2017, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1946 to April, week 4, 2017) and Embase (1980 to 2017, week 18). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings and reference lists of review articles. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), in all languages, which examined the efficacy of symptom relief and the safety of using HRT in women treated for endometrial cancer, where safety in this situation was considered as not increasing the risk of recurrence of endometrial cancer above that of women not taking HRT. We identified 2190 unique records, evaluated the full text of seven studies and included one study with 1236 participants. This study reported tumor recurrence in 2.3% of women in the estrogen arm versus 1.9% of women receiving placebo (risk ratio (RR) 1.17, 95% CI 0.54–2.50; very low-certainty evidence)...

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Hormone replacement therapy for women previously treated for endometrial cancer

Endometrial cancer is the sixth most common cancer in women world-wide and most commonly occurs after the menopause (75%). About 319,000 new cases were diagnosed world-wide in 2012. Endometrial cancer is commonly considered as a potentially 'curable cancer', as approximately 75% of cases are diagnosed before disease has spread outside the uterus. The overall 5-year survival for all stages is about 86%, and, if the cancer is confined to the uterus, the 5-year survival rate may increase to 97%. We searched the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2017, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1946 to April, week 4, 2017) and Embase (1980 to 2017, week 18). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings and reference lists of review articles. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), in all languages, which examined the efficacy of symptom relief and the safety of using HRT in women treated for endometrial cancer, where safety in this situation was considered as not increasing the risk of recurrence of endometrial cancer above that of women not taking HRT. We identified 2190 unique records, evaluated the full text of seven studies and included one study with 1236 participants. This study reported tumor recurrence in 2.3% of women in the estrogen arm versus 1.9% of women receiving placebo (risk ratio (RR) 1.17, 95% CI 0.54–2.50; very low-certainty evidence).

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Update on Femoston Conti Shortage

The supplier of Femoston Conti has advised that the recent supply shortage of Femoston Conti has been restored.

Pharmacies across Australia are currently being restocked. No other Femoston product has been affected by the shortage.  

 

22nd AMS Congress 2018

AMS Congress 2018 smallThe members of your Local Organising Committee are delighted to invite you to attend the 22nd AMS Congress.

Expand your knowledge on

 - primary vs secondary prevention of chronic disease
 - choices for risk reduction surgery
 - hormonal vs non-hormonal management of menopause
 - diet vs pharmacotherapy vs surgery for weight management
 - gender choices

To view the full program, click here

register now

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Menopause Essentials Update: Focus on genitourinary issues

The AMS Board is pleased to present this Menopause Update: Focus on genitourinary issues in association with the 44th ASPOG Annual Scientific Meeting.

Menopause Update 2 Aug 2018

This workshop is targeted at all GPs, specialists, allied health workers and other health professionals who are interested in the genitourinary conditions specific to menopause and general women’s midlife health.

Speakers and topics include:

Menopause basics: Dr Michele Kwik
Vulvovaginal atrophy: Dr Ann Olssen
Vulval disorders: Dr Ann Olssen
Urinary incontinence: Dr Lucy Bates

Morning tea is included

Date: Thursday 2 August 2018

Time: 9.00am to 12.30pm

Venue: Western Sydney University, Paramatta NSW

Download flyer here

For bookings

Go to the 44th ASPOG ASM 2018 Registration Site and for Menopause Essentials Update: Focus on genitourinary issues only
MEU only here 

To register for 44th ASPOG Annual Scientific Meeting and the Menopause Essentials Update: Focus on genitourinary issues:
ASPOG Meeting and MEU here  

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Join AMS for Member's only content 

Facts About Nonpharmacologic Options for Vasomotor Symptoms - NAMS Video

What We Know About Estrogen and Cardiovascular Health

Dr Risa Kagan MD, FACOG, CCD, NCMP

Clinical Professor Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences University of California, San Francisco East Bay Physicians Medical Group Berkeley, California.

Dr Kagan explains the evidence available for popular nonpharmacologic options for the treatment of vasomotor symptoms.

A message from The Editor of Climacteric

With the advent of a new IMS Board under the leadership of Professor Susan Davis, I thought it timely to bring you all up to date with the progress of our journal.

At the recent 16th IMS World Congress on the Menopause in Vancouver, Canada, our Editorial Board, Editors and publisher met to discuss progress and future plans. We will continue to publish six issues per year and, within those issues, we will from time to time have special themed issues with high-level reviews on topics of importance to us all. The first of these was on screening for women at midlife and was published in June. Our August issue will focus on Progesterone in its many guises. More special issues are planned as well, including one focusing on papers presented at the recent World Congress. We will continue to publish occasional issues of Climacteric in Chinese, including, from 2019, abstracts in Chinese available on line. I am hopeful that we may be able to establish a Spanish-language equivalent in the near future.

I am pleased to advise that Taylor & Francis will remain the publisher of Climacteric under a new 5-year contract signed in Vancouver.

I am also delighted to inform you that the most recent Impact Factor for Climacteric is 2.807, an increase of over 23% and the highest in the journal’s history. This is a testimony to our authors and to the standard of scientific papers published in our journal...

Weight gain after quitting smoking can be managed

Smokers give lots of reasons for not quitting smoking, with fear of weight gain ranking as one of the most favored, but a new study that followed smokers from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) confirms that even modest increases in physical activity can minimize weight gain in postmenopausal women after they have quit smoking. 

IMS Menopause Live: Applications invited for role of Scientific Editor of Menopause Live and Our Menopause World

The International Menopause Society (IMS) invites applications for the role of Scientific Editor for its premier e-services, Menopause Live and Our Menopause World, both key to the Society’s aim of disseminating evidence-based information about menopause on a regular basis. These services are perceived by the membership as two of the most highly valued services offered by the Society, helping physicians at all levels of their professional career to keep abreast of current research and reviews.

Our Menopause World is issued on the first Monday of each month; in addition to Society news, it includes a review of the current literature on menopause and women’s midlife health as well as various other news items that are considered of interest to the IMS membership.

Menopause Live is sent electronically to all IMS members on the other Mondays of each month. Each issue offers a brief summary of a recently published research paper or review relating to menopause and women’s midlife health, followed by a personal comment on the results, with reference to other relevant publications where appropriate...


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